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So What Does A “Senior Advocate” Really Mean?

Written by: Rebekah Phelps | October 2, 2009 11:13 PM in Household | 1444 views | Tags: senior advocate , senior services , escort , errands , shopping , bill paying , support , travel , scheduling , assistant , assisting

The Senior Advocate

Part 1 of 3

 

 

So what does a “senior advocate” really mean? Advocacy means someone who recommends or supports something or someone. To speak in favor of something, giving support, helper, somebody who acts or intercedes on the behalf of another, “lawyer” (lit. or fig.) someone who pleads another’s case.

 

Wow! I’ve been doing that my whole life and didn’t know what I was until this very minute! No seriously, a huge part of what I do (and always have been) is being the “Esther” on someone else’s behalf. Some of you may be familiar with Esther, she was the Diva in the Bible that went to the King on other’s behalf (at the risk of losing her own neck for speaking up) and had the attitude “I’m going to say it…and if I die I die!”

 

Perhaps the one thing you should know about me is: If I see something that needs to be dealt with, I’ll deal with it. I can’t stand seeing people mistreated and I can’t stand it when people pretend the “Purple Elephant” in the room doesn’t exist.  Some people are just flat out “speechless” when something happens to them and they fall into “victim” mode whether they mean to or not.

 

 

The Senior Advocate

Part 2 of 3

 

Perhaps they ARE the client, but they have a need…and they need it to be met. Hum…does that make sense? Like if you’re in a Doctor’s office and the Dr or the staff “get nasty” --- You have a need they should meet. They were referred by another Dr. and you don’t feel you have choices. But the price you end up paying is more than a deductible or co-pay, its them lording over you or being rude, abusive verbally or playing control games (like they are the ones behind the counter and can hold you up for hours, stretch your appointment out for months, keep you on hold FOREVER and a day or even having you wandering around the hospital or office vs. give you a simple map of directions). My favorite is the ignore game; they’ll punish you by not looking at you or act to busy to answer a question for the patient. Urrr.

 

 

 

The Senior Advocate

Part 3 of 3

 

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been with senior clients that I’ve had to step in and speak up. It’s not that at one time in their life they wouldn’t have (ie: a client I have is a retired trail lawyer), its that at this point in their lives they don’t feel like dealing with it, are confused, shocked or stunned or just don’t want to hassle with the situation.

 

Doctor’s come in with reports and diagnosis talking to people like they are new graduates of medical school and when patients are on meds, hurting, scared, tired or having trouble with organization of thoughts and things…..it’s too much to deal with alone. My gosh, just remembering what the Doctor said is difficult (for a normal healthy young person) and god forbid if they give you a list of “to-do’s” and appointments to make and go to thereafter!

 

I sat outside an office once with a client for 25 minutes making arrangements to pick up MRI’s, rescheduled tests and made follow up visits and scheduled a CT scan. He sat there in awe as if I’d just figured out how to get us both to the moon and back.

 

So many seniors need an Advocate, and that’s where I come in,

Rebekah    

 

Quote:    I am aware that in presenting myself as the advocate of the Indians and their rights, I shall stand very much alone.  Sam Houston

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